With the current public health crisis on our hands, many homeowners who have undertaken renovation projects may find themselves wondering if they are putting themselves and their families in danger by exposing their home to outside elements.

Here, we weigh the pros and cons of continuing such a project during the Coronavirus pandemic.

If you are planning a renovation, but haven’t started

Depending on if you have just closed on a home you plan to fix up, or you are beginning that long awaited kitchen remodel, we have a couple pieces of advice.

Buying a “new” old home

If the home is new to you and you are getting ready to seal the deal and start the demo process, this could be good news. With the stock market decline and lowered interest rates, you may be able to negotiate a better deal with your lender and your contractors.

Additionally, if you plan on living in your current home and moving into your new home once renovation is complete, you do not have to worry about coming into contact with contractors.

If you currently live in the home

The good news is, if your renovation project involves an addition, you are probably in the clear. Contractors are taking extra safety precautions to ensure that everything stays sanitized and bacteria free. And with most additions, there usually isn’t much traffic through the living areas of the home.

As for financial means, you may have to evaluate your income and job security to ensure you are still able to afford your project.

If you’re in the middle of your project

One pro of being in the middle of a renovation project during the Coronavirus outbreak is that your contractors are likely to be able to double down and advance your project quicker. Also, your orders for fixtures and materials have probably already arrived or are well on their way – so there shouldn’t be any worry about package delays.

However, depending on the scope of your project, you may be putting your family at risk of exposure. Talk with your contractor and ask about how they are being safe during this time.

Additionally, some companies may be charging extra hazard fees so confirm this with your contractor as well.

Ultimately, it is up to you to decide if the show must go on, or if you need to temporarily put a halt to your project. If you have done your research and chosen a company that you can depend on and trust, there should be no issue with continuing the project once everything is back to normal.

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